Peruvian gastronomy and cuisine is considered among the best in the world, inherited its innovation, mix and flavors from Peru’s history. Its culinary fusion developed over a long process of cultural exchange between the Spanish, Africans, Chinese, Japanese and Italians,among others. The dishes became more and more varied as races mixed and migrants landed at the port of Callao.

This fusion gives rise to dishes like the unique anticucho de corazón (skewered cow heart), tacu-tacu stew and carapulcra, dishes which have African heritage. Nutritious pastas arrived along with Italian migrants, whose adaptations have resulted in traditional dishes like green or red pasta. Ceviche.

Peruvian’s emblematic dish, emerged from a fusion with Japanese cuisine.

Lastly, the trend of Novo-Andean cuisine boasts indigenous foods worthy of the most elegant settings, reclaiming the national flavor that is such an important part of our identity.

Peruvian Gastronomy and Cuisine

Peruvian Cuisine reflects the country’s history, with a variety that is unique in the world.

We find dishes that sweeten our palates in every corner of Peru.

The cuisines of Lima, the North Coast, the Amazon, Arequipa, the Andes and Novo-Andean cuisine are waiting for you.


Amazonian Cuisine

Food from the Peruvian Amazon not only entices with its exotic dishes, but also attracts travelers with its great variety of delicacies such as beef, poultry, fish, mutton and pork.


It also offers other examples of Pachamama’s abundance, such as majaz, with its lean meat and delicious flavor, or plantains, used as a main ingredient in many recipes.

And what better companion for this tantalizing food than the fresh juice of countless kinds of fruit, or other drinks, such as masato guaranteed to pamper the palate of our most indulged visitors.


Loreto, Ucayali, San Martín and Madre de Dios

Food from eastern Peru is exotic. The biodiversity of its resources seems infinite. Chonta or palm heart, harvested from palm trees, is an important element of Amazonian cooking and is used to make salads.

The plantain is another key ingredient in Amazonian food. It is used to prepare tacacho, which is often served with pork cracklings or dried pork.

Juanes, pieces of chicken packed in cooked rice and wrapped in bijao leaves to cook; roast picuro, a species similar to the guinea pig; apinchado, cuts of pork stewed with peanuts and corn; andpatarashca, fish steamed in leaves in hot coals, are all examples of the flavors proffered by Amazonian dishes.

Juanes, pieces of chicken packed in cooked rice and wrapped in banana leaves to be lightly roasted; roast picuro, a species similar to the guinea pig; apinchado, cuts of pork stewed with peanuts and corn; and patarashca, fish steamed in leaves in hot coals, are all examples of the varied flavors proffered by Amazonian dishes.

Noteworthy soups include inchicapi, chicken prepared with peanuts, cilantro and cassava, and carachama soup, made from fish and accompanied with plantains and cilantro.

When it comes to drinks, the Amazon offers remarkable fresh juices made from countless types of fruit, such as aguajina and cocona, as well as concoctions like masato or chuchuhuasi, which is alcoholic, or uvachado, a fermented grape beverage, and chapo, prepared with banana and/or milk.

Andean Cuisine

The Peruvian mountains are synonymous with variety. Andean cuisine abounds with stews, soups, meats, and exquisite desserts made from corn, milk and fruits.

Combining the high nutritional value of the Andean ingredients in a traditional earthen pot over a wood fire to create the most delicious dishes. Chicha corn beer was the traditional beverage of the ancient inhabitants of the Andes, and the tradition still lives on today.

Come to Peru and taste the Peruvian Gastronomy in the differents regions of Peru.